The Milk Bath to Cleanse and Heal Violation and Transgression to Your Body and Soul

The Milk Bath to Cleanse and Heal Violation and Transgression to Your Body and Soul

The milk bath is commonly prescribed for healing women of specifically female issues. Issues of violation, rape, incest, assault, transgression against our female body and being. This healing may be extended to an entire female lineage as one does it, biological or otherwise or to one ancestress in particular who would benefit from it. Offering healing through our physical embodiment for one who no longer has a body is a common prescription. Men who are transgressed against in this way may also use this ritual as a way to heal and cleanse these violations.For this ritual you will need:4 cups of milk (any milk you choose is fine)A bathtubCandlesOne raw eggWood ash or salt

What are Shrines and Why Do We Build and Tend to Them?

What are Shrines and Why Do We Build and Tend to Them?

A shrine is a place or object that represents, holds and makes a space for a certain entity, abstract concept, idea or belief. At the shrine, offerings are made or prayers are said to and for what is held there. The practice of building shrines has many functions, some of which are psychological in that they allow us to externalize certain ineffable concepts, like the soul, or a relationship to a powerful but unseen being. Externalizing means giving form to something that we only feel, perceive and understand as untouchable, within or numinous. The practice of externalizing helps us to actively work with them, consider, and care for them in a way that is different from when they remain unseen or are internalized only. With the shrine, we are able to take that relationship, being or concept and place it in a concrete form outside of ourselves, look at it and interact with it in a real time, three-dimensional way.

What is Ritual and Why is it Important?

What is Ritual and Why is it Important?

Ritual is a time out of ordinary time. There are varying types of rituals, large group rituals, long intense rituals and then there are the small, everyday offerings that are also rituals, and these are the most common in this work. When I offer milk on my shrine for the grandmothers, I consider that a ritual. When I walk to the water and make an offering for a person in need, that is a ritual. When I pour water to the Earth, asking for conflict to be cleared and communication to be eased, that is a ritual. Ritual is so common to human experience that most of us don’t even notice how many we participate in within the span of one day. Do you call your children or your parents often and regularly? This too could be seen as a ritual: special time set aside just for them. Do you pray or say affirmations, engage in gratitude thinking? These too are rituals. Do you visit a place regularly to commune with nature? This too could be seen as a ritual.

A “Cheat Sheet” for Divining

A “Cheat Sheet” for Divining

Divination is essential for any medicine worker. We need to have a way to ask in to situations that need addressing and understand what to do to facilitate healing, clearing or effect change. Following is a simplified list of how to go about divination in general.The essential questions for divining are who, what, where, why, and when?These are the questions to direct any inquiry we enter into. It is also helpful to return to them when we feel overwhelmed by information that is coming in during a divination and are getting a bit lost in the deluge. Each medicine person is schooled in their own particular way to ask questions and receive answers. This is what I mean when I speak of divination and divining. If you have absolutely no training, begin to listen in your own way and take the the following as a broad guide.